Celebrate Black History Month with the Hartford History Center!

All of the following will be held in the Hartford History Center, Hartford Public Library, 500 Main Street

A Poet and the Poems of Rita Dove
Kate Rushin to Lead Book Talk on Former Poet Laureate
Tuesday, February 12, 6:30-8:00 p.m.

Connecticut-based poet Kate Rushin will lead an informal discussion on the poems of former national Poet Laureate and Pulitzer Prize winner Rita Dove as part of the Hartford History Center’s programming related to the lives and experiences of African Americans. Author of the award-winning poetry collection The Black Back-ups, and widely published and anthologized, Rushin is the former director of the Center for African American Studies and Visiting Writer at Wesleyan University, and currently teaches creative writing at the Oddfellows Playhouse Youth Theater. Register online at www.hplct.org. Twenty copies of Selected Poems are available to registered participants. Books are available on a first-come, first-served basis in the Hartford History Center (the Center is on the 3rd floor of the downtown library and open 1-5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday). Books generously provided by Connecticut Humanities.

 

Ghost Ships: Connecticut, the Slave Trade & Human Memory
Author Talk with Anne Farrow
Sunday, February 17, 2:00-2:45 p.m.

Photo courtesy of Anne Farrow

Independent historian Anne Farrow will discuss the story behind Ghost Ships: Connecticut, the Slave Trade & Human Memory, to be published by Wesleyan University Press in 2014. Anne followed a set of slaveship logs from New London to Sierra Leone, West Africa, and rebuilt a long-missing chapter from the story of Connecticut. Co-author of Complicity, How the North Promoted, Prolonged and Profited from Slavery (Random House/Ballantine Books, 2005), Anne will share her research and photographs from an abandoned slave castle in West Africa as she explores a forgotten history. Jazz follows in the Atrium. No registration required.

 

Exploring Frederick Douglass
A Book Talk with Writer, Educator and TV Host Stan Simpson
Tuesday, February 19,  6:30-8:00 p.m.,

As part of the Hartford History Center’s February programming of issues and literature key to African American life, Stan Simpson of Fox CT will lead an informal discussion of the immortal autobiography of black abolitionist and leader Frederick Douglass. The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass was first published in 1845, and is a short, hard-hitting classic by a man who escaped enslavement to become a national and world leader in the fight for black emancipation. Simpson, who was a writer and columnist for The Hartford Courantfor 20 years, currently hosts “The Stan Simpson Show” on Fox CT, and was the founding

Photo accessed from http://www.ctnow.com/news/stansimpson/, February 2013.

director of the Hartford Journalism & Media Academy at Weaver High School in Hartford. The Hartford History Center book discussion, which promises to be a lively and wide-ranging one, is free and open to everyone, but registration is required. To register go to www.hplct.org. Books are available on a first-come, first-served basis in the Hartford History Center (the Center is on the 3rd floor of the downtown library and open 1-5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday). Books generously provided by Connecticut Humanities.